Early Florida Georgia 2011 Preview Part 2: Can the Rivalry That Brings Out the Worst in Most Bring Out the Best in Muschamp?

Spread the love

As I promised, I’m going to break down the game 9 months before it’s played.

Must be some rivalry.

So, I’ll list the 3 key players on both teams (in order) one key matchup, an overall prediction and a score prediction.

Key Players for Georgia

1) QB Aaron Murray- some people get tired of hearing how the QB is the most important player in the game. Well, it’s true. Murray in a nutshell- he can run, he can throw, he can throw while running, he’s young and he’s experienced. In other words, Florida MUST pay attention to him at all time, kind of like everybody had to pay attention to Tebow at all times. He’s no Tebow, but he can make plays in a number of ways. Florida must force him out of the pocket, for even though he’s comfortable there, his receivers may not be, causing either an incompletion or a pick.

2) RB Isiash Crowell- this freshman running back will almost certainly see playing time against the Gators. He’s pretty fast, but he sees a hole and he’s gone. He’s got a great first step- and the rest aren’t bad either. If the Gators blitz and he gets through the line- watch out. He’s extremely dangerous in the open field. His only real weakness is that when he gets hammered to the deck, he tends to get shaken up.

3) TE Orson Charles- he catches and runs like a receiver, and while his blocking certainly isn’t awful, it’s not where an SEC tight end’s blocking abilities should be. He torched Florida in the 4th quarter last year, and the Gators must treat him like a wideout. Seriously, he’s not someone to forget about about, and Florida should seriously consider putting their #1 CB (whether that be Janoris Jenkins or Jaylen Watkins or whoever wins the job, but assume Jenkins) on him. Plus, he’s Aaron Murray’s favorite target and high school buddy.

Key Players for Florida

1) RB Jeff Demps- I don’t care who’s the QB, most likely he won’t have a load of confidence coming into this game. Either Brantley will be worried about losing his job or Driskel will worry about his first Florida-Georgia game. That won’t be a problem with Demps, who will be playing in his fourth and final Cocktail Party. As Georgia can attest to, Demps may be small, but as soon as you give him space, then start looking for your kick block team. He needs to break a long one in this game.

2) DT Sharrif Floyd- they say everything starts in the middle. Well, Sharrif Floyd has made a habit of starting games off with a pancake. For this reason, forget about gaps. The A-gap becomes a G-gap. What does G stand for? Gigantic. Because the center is usually flat on his back, allowing more defenders to break through the now gigantic A-gap. If need be, Floyd can also go left with surprising speed and bust a B or even a C gap. He wreaked havoc as a freshman and needs to do it some more against UGA in order to flush Murray out of the pocket.

3) LB Jelani Jenkins- like Floyd, the guy with Je. Jenkins on his jersey wreaked havoc as a freshman last year. The difference is, he’s usually in the second wave of blitzers, and if a hole opens up- Jenkins is through it immediately. He’s got great vision, which along with open field tackling is the most important trait in a linebacker. He’s also deceptively quick for his size. He may get some killshots on Murray, and he will be delighted to take advantage of them.

Key Matchup

Aaron Murray vs. Florida front 7: The Gators MUST PRESSURE MURRAY. I cannot stress this enough. Murray CANNOT be allowed time to sit back in the pocket. If the blitz does its job, he won’t. Against Georgia though, the blitz is a double edged sword- if Murray dumps off a screen to Crowell or Charles, then Florida is in trouble. So Muschamp needs to be careful when he dials one up.

Georgia just hauled in a fantastic recruiting class. But it pales in comparison to the one that Florida brought home a year ago under Meyer. The class from last year has more talent, more players, and more experience than Georgia’s Dream Team. Make no mistake, though, the Bulldogs’ 2011 class is a force to be reckoned with and will soon be doing a significant percentage of the team workload.

In 2012.

Which is not this year.

The Gators must also dethrone the royalty, or at least keep an eye on the Kings at Georgia. They are Caleb and Tavarres and are capable of doing unexpected damage. They must also dethrone Mark Richt, currently the longest tenured coach in the SEC. Wouldn’t that be great?

Here’s how to do it (for if Richt loses this game he is almost certainly gone following the season unless this is Georgia’s only loss).

1) Disguise the blitz packages.

Make it look like a 4 man rush, only to suddenly bring a pair of linebackers on the snap to rocket through the B-gaps for an uncontested shot at Murray. As much fun as it was criticizing Addazio, the main thing lost last year was QB pressure. We all made fun of Addazio because it kept us of sound mind, but the truth was that the Gators got very little pressure on opposing QB’s. In actuality, defensive play-calling is more important than offebsive play-calling for the simple reason that if you screw up, it could mean a long touchdown.

But I’m not worried about that with Muschamp, a very good defensive play-caller. After the game, when I dig this post out, there will almost certainly be a check next to it.

2) Deflate Georgia with the huge play early.

There’s nothing like devastating an opponent early in a rivalry game. I know from experience because my high school team beat its archrival 23-14, and early in the game our d-lineman blocked a punt following a great drive. The opponent came back late- but too late. I saw the opponent’s expressions. They looked like they wanted to quit right there.

So the play-calling on offense needs to be as unpredictable as Addazio’s wasn’t. On the first play of a big drive- hell, the first offensive play of the game for Florida- flea-flicker bomb.

Why the hell not?

Even if it fails, the Bulldogs will see that Brantley (or Driskel) has the balls to just chuck it in a rivalry game like this, and they will need to keep a few guys deep just in case Charlie Weis tries again.

When I say deflate, I don’t just mean make a big play.

You guys see where I’m heading?

Maybe it’s the Gators’ turn to transform the end zone into some scene from High School Musical.

Whatever it is, the Gators MUST MUST MUST do something to take the wind out of Georgia early on, so the rest of the game is simply clean up.

3) Special Teams must be truly special

The last time the Gators blocked a kick or a punt and lost was when Ron Zook was the coach. Since Muschamp holds special teams almost as dearly as Meyer, expect him to load the punt/kick block team with speed.

Also, a big kickoff or punt return could be a vital jump start.

4) No stupid penalties

It seems stupid to put here, since it is a boilerplate part of every pre-game pep talk to not do anything stupid that will cost your team. But no rivalry gets more chippy misbehavior than this one.

Reggie Nelson is lucky the refs missed his hit on Kris Durham in 2006 or he wouldn’t just have been flagged, he’d have been arrested.

How lucky was Brandon Spikes not to get caught attempting to poke Washaun Ealey in the eyes?

Equally lucky was Nick Williams, who was miffed over getting trucked by Tim Tebow the previous year, and decided to retaliate by knocking Tebow down- a full two seconds after he handed the ball of to Jeff Demps.

Both teams need to cut it out, although if a Bulldog mugs a Gator and gets flagged, I don’t really care. But the Gators cannot afford to kill themselves with a personal foul and 15 free yards to Georgia, regardless of who has the ball.

5) Contain the deep bomb

This is always standard as well, but again, more so in a rivalry. The Gators cannot allow anybody to get loose deep. If they do, it will kill them.

Prediction:

I’m not sure Mark Richt really knows what to do with the talent he has. But there’s something really wrong with UGA and Jacksonville. They just don’t mesh well. Even when UGA is clearly better, Florida wins.

Look at 2002, 2005 and 2010. Does anybody really believe that Florida was the better team?

Throw all strategy out the window, and you’d all still pick Florida. And that’s what I’m going to do.

Because over the past 21 years, Florida has won 18 and lost 3. Those are numbers I’d put my money on. The strategy I listed is how Florida wins; the mere fact that Georgia suffers a hex against Florida is why.

Bottom line?

The hex is so bad that Georgia’s screwed before they even walk on the field, as talented as they are.

Florida 41, Georgia 21.

  • Article By :
    Creator and founder of IAKOW 2.0

22 thoughts on “Early Florida Georgia 2011 Preview Part 2: Can the Rivalry That Brings Out the Worst in Most Bring Out the Best in Muschamp?

  1. Great job Neil, but I think Brantley will be ok under Charlie Weiss, he did make Matt Cassel look like an all-pro for awhile and he is a second tier qb, and hopefully Richt never leaves Georgia I’m having too much fun watching those games for that to happen

  2. Great post Neil. Only thing is that when we score an opening touchdown I hope we do something a little less gay than a high school musical scene.:p Somehow I don’t think that would deflate UGA all that much.:D

  3. Not sure which Jelani Jenkins you were watching last year, but the one I saw showed great athleticism and zero instinct.

    Also, what do you mean he’s deceptively quick for his size ? He’s not big. He’s considered an undersized LB and his main knock during recruitment was “lack of size” which was not a concern with Marotti as the strength coach.

    I like your site man. It’s a great outlet for use to all talk. However, I seriously question your knowledge of football in general, let alone the Gators. Your write up reads like a plagiarized pre season mag, with Gator player names swapped. In fact, reading your “observations” regarding Jenkins, it’s almost as if you simply took the Spikes write up and swapped Jenkins’ name in.

    Georgia is not a concern this year. Their line is in flux, having yet to find an Oline coach. AJ Green is gone. Georgia with Green was a threat. Georgia without Green was a farce.

    Georgia was 1-3 without him. 1-4 if you count the Colorado game when he was just getting his legs back. That being said, they were 5-4 with him, and did not register one win of any importance, unless you count a rebuilding ACC team. They couldn’t even manage a TD vs a Conference USA team.

    I’d be more concerned with how good UT looked once they dumped the albino chicklet and went with Bray.

    The key players will be the DTs, the Safeties and whoever mans the middle. Georgia is a north and south team so it’s in Florida’s best interests to force them into an east-west game.

  4. Great work Neil, we will continue our dominance over Georgia. Dang shame that Mark signed a great class and he won’t be around to see them become Juniors. @ The Bone I like that you speak your mind all opinions should be welcomed.

  5. You make decent points, but I remember Jenkins picking off LSU and tearing 50 yards the other way with it. He wasn’t a speed demon, but for his bulk that was pretty good. And while he is an undersized linebacker, he’s still a linebacker. Generally not the fastest players on the field, yet he burned Michael Ford, a running back, on the return.

    As for plagiarism… I do look at other people’s sites to get ideas occasionally but when I do that, I put them into my own words and try to veer off to make a point that is different from the one I saw reading the other site. In other words, I’ll read an article, take some of the info, and turn it into a completely different topic.

    Georgia is not a concern this year. They weren’t a concern in 2007 either. Everyone expected Florida to jump on the Dawgs and back into the SEC East lead, and the Gators lay a big fat egg.

    Georgia should have beaten Florida last year, too. They turned the ball over four times and allowed Trey Burton a 52 yard TD on what would have been a 15 yard gain at most for other teams. Asher Allen would have been there to at least push him out of bounds, but whoever that cornerback was got badly out of position and had no chance at catching Burton from that horrible angle.

    Your last point agrees with me. We need to force Murray out of the pocket and make him run sideways.

  6. Well obviously something different than that hopefully something more awesome. I don’t think Georgia will be able to do anything about it anyway.

  7. By the way, Jenkins made the all-SEC freshman team. He definitely had good vision. I don’t remember saying instinct, but if I mistakenly did, then I meant vision. There is a huge difference.

  8. The ultimate point is, Jelani is known as being fast but small, so that ‘s why the “fors his size” comment was a little off.

    As for Georgia being a threat in 2007, sure it wasn’t until they uncovered Moreno, but anyone other than a Gators’ homer knew Stafford and the rest of the team was no joke.

  9. And may I remind you, while Georgia looked formidable in 2007 with Stafford, they didn’t beat the REAL Florida – they beat a crippled Tebow playing behind a line that had 3 practices to switch from stunts, traps, pulls and the likes to become a pocket passing team.

  10. Vision and instinct are essentially the same thing. You can have instinct and no vision, as your instinct may lend itself to other areas, but you can’t have vision without instinct.

    “Vision” is essentially anticipation and visualization – offshoots of instinct.

  11. I approach things from a realist point of view. Jelani to me isn’t a key player for that game. What’s key is his development for the season.

    To me, Bostic should be a key player. He needs to develop as well.

  12. Not really… vision is seeing a gap wide open in the line that’s only open for a nanosecond… instinct is just guessing correctly where the play will be run.

  13. Honestly, and I know this sounds like I just saying this to make myself look beter, I really vacillated between putting Jon Bostic and Jelani Jenkins in that spot. The reason I put Jenkins is because Bostic has already slightly more than Jenkins. At this point, Bostic is a better linebacker… so if Jenkins plays really well, then Florida has two great linebackers

  14. Again bone hits the nail on the hammer. Like ya Neil but your king of the obvious. I mean deflate Georgia with huge plays early….really that;s like saying we need to score more points through the first and 4th quarter.

  15. Wrong again, son.

    Instinct is knowing WHERE to look for the opening. It’s also knowing whether or not that opening is a bust or a trap.

    Spot a wide open jailbreak, your instincts (if good) should tell you to look laterally for someone slipping out.

    No offense Neil, but “vision” isn’t what you see on your EA sports game or your television set.

    You ever hear coaches and analysts talk about QBs who can “feel the backside pressure?”

    We know there’s no way in hell they feel the footsteps and we also know they actually aren’t counting steamboats in their heads.

    Exactly what do you think they mean ?

    Let’s see you explain that.

    Not trying to be an *ssh*le, but I am getting the sense that you’re a young guy. There’s obviously nothing wrong with that; I didn’t spontaneously materialize out of thin air at the age of 36 – I was born and was young once as well. Where I am going with this is, your arguments. Observations and analysis seem “young.” After my playing days ended, I got into coaching. I’ve been around the game for 28 years. I’ve been coaching for 16. I have a feeling I’ve been around the game longer than you’ve been alive. In fact, just my 16 years coaching alone feels like it’s longer than you’ve been alive.

    Again, there’s nothing wrong with being young and if you’re a teenager and heavily into football, it’s excellent. My point is your arguments sound like those I hear from my players.

  16. Let me further clarify the vision thing. Vision isn’t seeing the hole and hitting it – it closes too quickly. Everyone can see the hole. Vision is seeing it BEFORE it opens. It’s seeing the series of movements that will lead to it opening.

    The best way to explain is one of the following:

    Ever go to a baseball game, hockey game or NASCAR race ?

    Ever have that moment where the puck ricochets, the foul ball comes off the crack of the bat, or the tire from the car flies off ?

    At the precise moment the puck ricochets, the bat cracks and the tire springs loose, THE very instant, you see things go in slow motion. Right away you know something bad has the potential of happening.

    Hell, maybe you were in school, saw something in your peripheral vision, turned your head and, in slow motion, you saw a projectile coming toward you and you moved.

    That is vision. It was best depicted in Sam Raimi’s Spiderman movies, particularly the first one when Flash Thompson approached Peter Parker to sucker punch him and his Spidersense went off and he was seeing things in slow motion.

    That is vision. It is intrinsically linked to instinct.

  17. @thebone,

    Yes I am 16, but I’m also a GA for my high school team, and sometimes help out with the offense. My feeling is that I wouldn’t have been offered the job if I didn’t know anything. I’ll be honest- I know far more about offense than about defense. The problem is, Muschamp is the other way around, meaning that Florida will rely on defense first (though less so with Weis). If defense is the more important part of the game, then the most key players should be on that side.

    But vision and instinct aren’t quite the same. Speed and acceleration aren’t quite the same, but they’re closely related.

    There is a slight difference like I mentioned.

  18. Ok. You’re 16 and I’ve been coaching as long as you’ve been alive.

    As far as your quote:

    “But vision and instinct aren’t quite the same. Speed and acceleration aren’t quite the same, but they’re closely related.

    There is a slight difference like I mentioned.”

    Wrong. Your original premise was they are nothing at all alike.

    My original premise was they’re essentially the same thing, which you tried to refute:

    Bone – “Vision and instinct are essentially the same thing. You can have instinct and no vision, as your instinct may lend itself to other areas, but you can’t have vision without instinct.”Vision” is essentially anticipation and visualization offshoots of instinct.”

    Neil – “Not really… vision is seeing a gap wide open in the line that’s only open for a nanosecond… instinct is just guessing correctly where the play will be run.”

    As I mentioned in a post a bit earlier today >

    “Let me further clarify the vision thing. Vision isn’t seeing the hole and hitting it – it closes too quickly. Everyone can see the hole. Vision is seeing it BEFORE it opens. It’s seeing the series of movements that will lead to it opening.

    The best way to explain is one of the following:

    Ever go to a baseball game, hockey game or NASCAR race ?

    Ever have that moment where the puck ricochets, the foul ball comes off the crack of the bat, or the tire from the car flies off ?

    At the precise moment the puck ricochets, the bat cracks and the tire springs loose, THE very instant, you see things go in slow motion. Right away you know something bad has the potential of happening.

    Hell, maybe you were in school, saw something in your peripheral vision, turned your head and, in slow motion, you saw a projectile coming toward you and you moved.

    That is vision. It was best depicted in Sam Raimi’s Spiderman movies, particularly the first one when Flash Thompson approached Peter Parker to sucker punch him and his Spidersense went off and he was seeing things in slow motion.

    That is vision. It is intrinsically linked to instinct.”

    As for you being 16 and being as GA, that’s cool. You probably do know a thing or two about offense.

    You also could be the coach’s son, nephew etc. Boyfriend of the coach’s daughter. Maybe you tried out, and didn’t make it, but the coach really liked you because you’re a hard worker. Maybe your best friend is he QB and he was district neutral and where he went depended on where his buddy went.

    There a million different reasons a person can be a GA on a high school team that have nothing to do with football knowledge.

    At my high school, the basketball team manager ended up playing for the team. He was the manager (translation – water boy) for 2.5 years and halfway through 12th grade, one of the key players had had enough of the coach and quit the team. Guess who started dressing and sitting on the bench, getting some minutes in game to give people a rest ? Yep, water boy.

    Now, that’s not to say you earned your GA for anything other than football knowledge. However, I am saying tossing out GA of a high school team when you’re in high school, isn’t the best credential.

  19. As die hard Gator fans whatever we read about our team is going ti be a little obvious. Keep doing what you do Neil I look forward to everything you write.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*